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CTE courses provide students with an opportunity to develop specific academic, technical, and 21st century skills necessary to be successful in career and in life. In pursuit of ensuring every student in Tennessee achieves this level of success, we begin with rigorous course standards which feed into intentionally designed programs of study. Students engage in industry relevant content through general education integration and experiences such as career & technical student organizations (CTSO) and work-based learning (WBL). Through these experiences, students are immersed with industry standard content and technology, solve industry-based problems, meaningfully interact with industry professionals and use/produce industry specific, informational texts.

Agriscience is an introductory laboratory science course that prepares students for biology, subsequent science and agriculture courses, and postsecondary study. This course helps students understand the important role that agricultural science and technology plays in the twenty-first century. In addition, it serves as the first course for all programs of study in the Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources cluster. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for success in more advanced agriculture and science coursework. This course counts as a lab science credit toward graduation requirements.

Agricultural Fabrication and Biosystems Engineering is an applied course that prepares students for further study or careers in engineering, environmental science, agricultural design and research, and agricultural mechanics and fabrication. Special emphasis is given to the many modern applications of geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS) to achieve various agricultural goals. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to pursue advanced training in agricultural engineering, industral, mechanical and related fields at a postsecondary institution.

Anatomy and Physiology is designed to develop an understanding of the structures and functions of the human body, while relating those to knowledge and skills associated with pathophysiology. Page 2 Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to (1) apply the gross anatomy from earlier courses to a deeper understanding of all body systems, (2) identify the organs and structures of the support and movement systems, (3) relate the structure and function of the communication, control, and integration system, and (4) demonstrate a professional, working understanding of the transportation, respiration, excretory, and reproduction systems.

Coding I is a course intended to teach students the basics of computer programming. The course places emphasis on practicing standard programming techniques and learning the logic tools and methods typically used by programmers to create simple computer applications. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to solve problems by planning multistep procedures; write, analyze, review, Page 2 and revise programs, converting detailed information from workflow charts and diagrams into coded instructions in a computer language; and will be able to troubleshoot/debug programs and software applications to correct malfunctions and ensure their proper execution.

Coding II challenges students to develop advanced skills in problem analysis, construction of algorithms, and computer implementation of algorithms as they work on programming projects of increased Primary Career Cluster: Information Technology (IT) Course Contact: CTE.Standards@tn.gov Course Code(s): C10H15 Prerequisite(s): Coding I (C10H14) Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11 Focus Elective Graduation Requirements: This course satisfies one of three credits required for an elective focus when taken in conjunction with other Information Technology courses. Program of Study (POS) Concentrator: This course satisfies one out of two required courses that meet the Perkins V concentrator definition, when taken in sequence in the approved program of study. Programs of Study and Sequence: This is the third course in the Coding program of study. Aligned Student Organization(s) SkillsUSA: http://www.tnskillsusa.com Technology Student Association (TSA): http://www.tntsa.org Coordinating Work-Based Learning: Teachers are encouraged to use embedded WBL activities such as informational interviewing, job shadowing, and career mentoring. For information, visit https://www.tn.gov/content/tn/education/career-andtechnical-education/work-based-learning.html. Available Student Industry Certifications: Students are encouraged to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skills learned in this course by earning the appropriate, aligned departmentpromoted industry certifications. Access the promoted list here for more information. Teacher Endorsement(s): 037, 041, 055, 056, 057, 152, 153, 203, 204, 311, 413, 434, 435, 436, 470, 474, 475, 476, 477, 582, 595, 596, 740, 742, 952, 953 Required Teacher Certifications/Training: All endorsements except for 742 will require either the NOCTI test code 5906: Computer Programming certification or the equivalent of twelve semester hours of computer course work including at least six hours of programming language. Teacher Resources: https://www.tn.gov/education/career-and-technical-education/careerclusters/cte-cluster-information-technology.html Page 2 complexity. In so doing, they develop key skills of discernment and judgment as they must choose from among many languages, development environments, and strategies for the program life cycle. Course content is reinforced through numerous short- and long-term programming projects, accomplished both individually and in small groups. These projects are meant to hone the discipline and logical thinking skills necessary to craft error-free syntax for the writing and testing of programs. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will demonstrate an understanding of object-oriented programming language using high-level languages such as FOCUS, Python, or SAS.

Clinical Internship is a capstone course and work-based learning experience designed to provide students with real-world application of skills and knowledge obtained in a pre-requisite Health Science course. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to pursue certification in the pre-requisite course of Cardiovascular Services, Exercise Physiology, Medical Therapeutics or Pharmacological Science. Prior to beginning work at a clinical site, students must be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and deemed competent in basic first aid, body mechanics, Standard Precaution guidelines, and confidentiality.

Computer Science Foundations (CSF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design, Primary Career Cluster: Information Technology (IT) Course Contact: CTE.Standards@tn.gov Course Code(s): C10H11 Prerequisite(s): None Credit: 1 credit for core and two focus areas. 2 credits for all 36 standards. Grade Level: 9 Focus Elective Graduation Requirement: This course satisfies one or two of three credits required for an elective focus when taken in conjunction with other IT courses. Program of Study (POS) Concentrator: This course satisfies one out of two required courses that meet the Perkins V concentrator definition, when taken in sequence in the approved program of study. Programs of Study and Sequence: This is the first course in the Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design, and Cybersecurity programs of study. Aligned Student Organization(s) SkillsUSA: http://www.tnskillsusa.com Technology Student Association (TSA): http://www.tntsa.org Coordinating WorkBased Learning: Teachers are encouraged to use embedded WBL activities such as informational interviewing, job shadowing, and career mentoring. For information, visit https://www.tn.gov/content/tn/education/career-andtechnical-education/work-based-learning.html. Available Student Industry Certifications: Students are encouraged to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skills learned in this course by earning the appropriate, aligned departmentpromoted industry certifications. Access the promoted list here for more information. Teacher Endorsement(s): 037, 041, 055, 056, 057, 152, 153, 203, 204, 311, 434, 435, 436, 470, 474, 475, 476, 477, 582, 595, 740, 742, 952, 953 Required Teacher Certifications/Training: None Teacher Resources: https://www.tn.gov/education/career-and-technical-education/careerclusters/cte-cluster-information-technology.html Page 2 and Cybersecurity. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of four focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web publication. Upon completion of the CSF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision about which Information Technology program of study to pursue.

Criminal Justice I is the first course in Criminal Justice and Correction Services program of study. It serves as a comprehensive survey of how the law enforcement, legal, and correctional systems interact with each other in the United States. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will understand the context of local, state, and federal laws, the concepts of crime control and the judicial process, and the importance of communications and professionalism in law enforcement.

Criminal Justice II is the second course in the Criminal Justice and Correction Services program of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will understand the impact of the constitution on law enforcement, law enforcement and police procedures, alcohol and beverage laws, sentencing, and the importance of communications and professionalism in law enforcement.

Forensic Criminal Investigations is the third course designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to be successful in the sciences of criminal investigations. Students will learn terminology and investigation skills related to the crime scene, aspects of criminal behavior, and applications of the scientific inquiry to solve crimes. By utilizing the scientific inquiry method, students will obtain and analyze evidence through simulated crime scenes and evaluation of case studies. Upon Primary Career Cluster: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security Course Contact: CTE.Standards@tn.gov Course Code(s): C30H02 Prerequisite(s): Criminal Justice I (C30H00) and Criminal Justice II (C30H01) Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11-12 Focused Elective Graduation Requirements: This course satisfies one of three credits required for an elective focus when taken in conjunction with other Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security courses. POS Concentrator: This course satisfies one out of two required courses to meet the Perkins V concentrator definition, when taken in sequence in the approved program of study. Programs of Study and Sequence: This is the third course in the Criminal Justice and Correction Services program of study. Aligned Student Organization(s): SkillsUSA: https://www.skillsusatn.org/ Coordinating WorkBased Learning: Teachers are encouraged to use embedded WBL activities such as informational interviewing, job shadowing, and career mentoring. For information, visit https://www.tn.gov/education/career-and-technicaleducation/work-based-learning.html Available Student Industry Certifications: None Teacher Endorsement(s): 590, 750 Required Teacher Certifications/Training: None Teacher Resources: https://www.tn.gov/education/career-and-technical-education/careerclusters/cte-cluster-law-public-safety.html Page 2 completion of this course, proficient students will be able to identify careers forensic science and criminology, summarize the laws that govern the application of forensic science, and draw key connections between the history of the forensic science system and the modern legal system.

Fashion Design is an applied-knowledge course intended to prepare students to pursue careers in the fashion industry. Building on the knowledge acquired in Foundations of Fashion Design, this course places special emphasis on apparel manufacturing and merchandising, marketing applications, and product and service management. In addition, students will explore trends in fashion design and engage with industry-specific technologies used to produce a variety of fabrics, Page 2 garments, and accessories. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will have created an original fashion collection

Foundations of Fashion Design introduces students to the rich history of the fashion industry and the basic design principles that are integral to its operation. This course studies the history of the fashion industry, elements and principles of design, textile history and composition, as well as basic construction principles. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to demonstrate basic garment production and will create artifacts for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout Page 2 the program of study.

Health Science Education is an introductory course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of public health, therapeutics, health services administration, diagnostics, and support services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in these fields, compare and contrast the features of healthcare systems, explain the legal and ethical ramifications of the healthcare setting, and begin to perform foundational healthcare skills. This Page 2 course will serve as a strong foundation for all of the Health Science programs of study as well as the Health Services Administration program of study.

Introduction to Business and Marketing is an introductory course designed to give students an overview of the Business Management and Administration, Marketing, and Finance career clusters. The course helps students prepare for the growing complexities of the business world by examining basic principles of business, marketing, and finance in addition to exploring key aspects of leadership, ethical and social responsibilities, and careers. Students’ academic skills in communications, mathematics, and economics are reinforced with activities modeled in the context of business topics. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be equipped with the foundational skills to succeed in any of the Business, Marketing, or Finance programs of study and will be prepared to make an informed decision regarding which pathways they would like to pursue in high school.

Principles of Agricultural Mechanics is an intermediate course introducing students to basic skills and knowledge in construction and land management for both rural and urban environments. This course covers topics including project management, basic engine and motor mechanics, land surveying, irrigation and drainage, agricultural structures, and basic metalworking techniques. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in agricultural mechanics.

Manufacturing Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous Advanced Manufacturing courses within a professional, working environment. While continuing to add to their technical skillsets, students in this course assume increasing responsibility for overseeing manufacturing processes and managing complex projects. Specifically, proficient students will be able to work in teams to plan the production of a sophisticated product; develop troubleshooting and problem solving mechanisms to ensure that projects run smoothly; analyze output and compile professional reports; and connect practicum activities to career and postsecondary opportunities. For all projects undertaken in this course, students are expected to follow the focus area in their chosen program of study (Machining Technology, Industrial Maintenance Technology, Mechatronics, or Welding), while also refining skills previously acquired to achieve deeper levels of mastery. Upon completion of the practicum, proficient students will be prepared for postsecondary study and career advancement in their chosen focus area.

Medical Therapeutics is an applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in therapeutic and nursing services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in therapeutics services; assess, monitor, evaluate, and report patient/client health status; and identify the purpose and components of treatments.

Principles of Machining I is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge to be effective in production environments as a machinist, CNC operator, or supervisor. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will demonstrate safety practices concerning machining technology, proper measurement and layout techniques, reading and interpreting drawings and blueprints, production design processes, and quality control procedures. Upon completion of this course, students will be knowledgeable about potential postsecondary education and career opportunities related to machining technology and will be prepared to enroll in more advanced machining courses in high school.

Principles of Machining II is an advanced level contextual course that builds on the introductory skills learned in the entry-level manufacturing and machining courses, stressing the concepts and practices in a production environment supported by advanced machining and engineering facilities. Working with the course instructor and team members in a cooperative learning environment, students will design, produce, and maintain products that are defined by detailed technical specifications. Emphasis is placed on quality control, safety and engineering codes and standards, and production-grade machining systems, building on the learner’s past knowledge, current experiences, and future conduct as a career machinist. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to examine blueprints and specification drawings to plan and implement the manufacture of products, machine parts to specifications using both manual and computercontrolled machine tools, and measure, examine, and test completed products to check for defects and conformance to specifications.

Principles of Manufacturing is designed to provide students with exposure to various occupations and pathways in the Advanced Manufacturing career cluster, such as Machining Technology, Industrial Maintenance Technology, Mechatronics, and Welding. In order to gain a holistic view of the advanced manufacturing industry, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two focus areas. Throughout the course, they will develop an understanding of the general steps involved in the manufacturing process and master the essential skills to be an effective team member in a manufacturing production setting. Course content covers basic quality principles and processes, blueprints and schematics, and systems. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will advance from this course with a nuanced understanding of how manufacturing combines design and engineering, materials science, process technology, and quality. Upon completion of the Principles of Manufacturing course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision regarding which Advanced Manufacturing program of study to pursue.

Principles of Plant Science and Hydroculture focuses on essential knowledge and skills related to the science of plant growth. This course covers principles of plant health, growth, reproduction, and biotechnology, as well as fundamental principles of hydroponics and aquaponics. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in horticulture science

Welding I is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge to effectively perform cutting and welding applications used in the advanced manufacturing industry. Proficient students will develop proficiency in fundamental safety practices in welding, interpreting drawings, creating computer aided drawings, identifying and using joint designs, efficiently laying out parts for fabrication, basic shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), mechanical and thermal properties of metals, and quality control. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to sit for the AWS SENSE Entry Level Welder certification and will be prepared to undertake more advanced welding coursework.

Welding II is designed to provide students with opportunities to effectively perform cutting and welding applications of increasingly complexity used in the advanced manufacturing industry. Proficient students will build on the knowledge and skills of the Welding I course and apply them in novel environments, while learning additional welding techniques not covered in previous courses. Specifically, students will be proficient in (1) fundamental safety practices in welding, (2) gas metal arc welding (GMAW), (3) flux cored arc welding (FCAW), (4) gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), and (5) quality control methods. Upon completion of the Welding II course, proficient students will be eligible to complete the American Welding Society (AWS) Entry Welder or the AWS SENSE Advanced Welders qualifications and certifications.